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Digital rights Law & Freedom

Quick and Honest Guide to Creative Commons Licenses

CCGuide.png

In a way, the best way to fight piracy is by making it impossible for people to do illegal things with your works.

Zacqary Adam Green came up with this handy guide to Creative Commons for his article on copyright reform. Funny as it may seem, it is a very practical and straight-to-the-point analysis of the licenses, since it seems that you can only enforce a license as long as you can afford the legal battle.

In the case of software licensing, it is not recommended to use a Creative Commons license, since they were not designed for that use. CC was thought for artistic works, and although software is considered “art” in some countries’ copyright laws, they are practical works, more than just artistic ones. That is why using a Free Software license is recommended instead. They were designed to cover any technical and practical use for the work that you need to protect. Also, there are organizations like the Software Freedom Law Center that help developers and non-profit organizations to enforce their licenses among many other services with little or no budget.

I don’t know if there is something similar to defend works under a CC or similar free license. Maybe there’s an unexplored business opportunity for law firms.

Categories
Digital rights Law & Freedom GNU/Linux Free Software & Open Source News

Chrome license makes Google more than the new Big Brother


Yesterday’s big news was that Google released their own “open source” browser called Google Chrome. They released only the binaries for Windows, and even thought they claim to be open source, I don’t see where I can get the source code yet.

But what really bothers me is the license agreements for Chrome:

11. Content license from you
11.1 You retain copyright and any other rights you already hold in Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. By submitting, posting or displaying the content you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services. This license is for the sole purpose of enabling Google to display, distribute and promote the Services and may be revoked for certain Services as defined in the Additional Terms of those Services.

This means that if you publish a blog post, upload a photo or release a song or software, Google has the right to use it for whatever they want, royalty-free.
You're being spied on, by WeMeantDemocracy

Photo Creative Commons by WeMeantDemocracy

So this makes Google more than a Big Brother, which only watches your every move. This one can commercialize what you do as well.

I advice you, as always, to read your license agreements when you install software, or better yet, use free software.

I’ll stick with Mozilla Firefox, which besides of a good licence, has major benefits for me with all its extensions. I can forgive a few crashes in exchange of openness and in keeping my data mine.